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denialtwister asked:

Hey there! How does John Linnell amplify his accordion(s)? I'm quite curios! Also, any advice for playing accordions in live venues! Cheers! :)

tmbgareok:

JL’s accordion has 3 microphones mounted inside the grill of the accordion going to wireless packs. The mice are super-small—I think they were designed for television or the theatrical stage. The work quite well although they occasionally turn in the rigging and the “sweet spot” gets funky” (and occasionally the fall off the rigging completely which sounds like a musical garbage truck colliding with an iron lung) 

dear 98% of the people that follow me that dont talk to me

cirquedurartastic:

tamaraldbrennan:

Who are you

Whats your favorite color

Favorite ship

Favorite ice cream flavor

Do you have a cat

Thank

ooh ooh ooh! yes!

Favorite color? Blue.

Favorite ship? I don’t really participate in fandom that way — but, with that said, around seven years ago I happened across some Torchwood fanfic that was centered on Captain Jack knitting and flirting with people which made me pretty happy. (one example / another example)

Favorite ice cream flavor — Three Sisters in Providence used to have a Mexican chocolate ice cream that I loved, but they don’t have it any more. The dirty mint ice cream there is pretty good though.

Regarding cats — I don’t own a cat — I like cats but I also find not having one kind of enjoyable. I do sing a couple of songs about cats, though. (And one about dogs.)

(Source: 314eater)

Bob Kerr: Fort Foreclosure is on the financial edge — again

Will Schaff’s a Rhode Island institution whose artwork has graced the covers of albums by Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Brown Bird, Alec K. Redfearn and the Eyesores, and many other bands of note. You can help him pay off his mortgage by buying some of his art via his IndieGoGo campaign. In addition to helping Will out, it seems to me that you will also be getting kind of an amazing deal on some one of a kind art; I opted for the ‘mail art of the month’ option, where you get a dozen customized and hand-illustrated letters and postcards mailed to you. But the $9 deck of cards was also tempting, or the stationary, or …

Anyway, read the article, which is interesting, and have a look to see what Will’s got on offer and see if you want any of it!

Type these words into your music library and name the first song that appears

rartastic:

Can any of you help me? This is my very first attempt at free motion machine quilting, so obviously it is not perfect. I am fine with wavy lines instead of smooth ones, but the back side (orange fabric) of the sandwich reveals that I have some serious problems. The bobbin thread is nice and straight but the top side thread is all looped and whatnot. 

I have the stitch length set to the minimum. 

Advice?

A friend of my aunt’s chimes in: “This is definitely a machine tension issue.  I would begin by rethreading the machine, maybe even rewinding the bobbin, then try changing the needle.  Make sure the presser foot is down.  (Sometimes, since the free motion/darning foot floats above the quilt, people forget to lower the lever for the presser foot.)

If she is moving the quilt sandwich too fast, slow down, or just the opposite—if moving too slow, speed up. Without seeing the machine, it really is hard to tell. 
Some quilters set their machine tension to zero, which sounds wrong, but it can work! 
Is the same thread in both top and bobbin?  Is the needle the right size for the thread weight?  
Cindy Needham’s website or YouTube videos may be helpful.
Besides Cindy, Harriet Hargrave’s book Heirloom Machine Quilting is a great source of information for everyone who wants to learn free motion quilting
Hope this helps.  Now I’ve got to go to my machine and be productive!”

rartastic:

Can any of you help me? This is my very first attempt at free motion machine quilting, so obviously it is not perfect. I am fine with wavy lines instead of smooth ones, but the back side (orange fabric) of the sandwich reveals that I have some serious problems. The bobbin thread is nice and straight but the top side thread is all looped and whatnot. 

I have the stitch length set to the minimum. 

Advice?

My mother speculated: “I have been thinking - one thing that can do that is using the wrong size bobbin - they are not standardized.  Did she change bobbins per chance?”

rartastic:

Can any of you help me? This is my very first attempt at free motion machine quilting, so obviously it is not perfect. I am fine with wavy lines instead of smooth ones, but the back side (orange fabric) of the sandwich reveals that I have some serious problems. The bobbin thread is nice and straight but the top side thread is all looped and whatnot. 

I have the stitch length set to the minimum. 

Advice?

My friend Sarah said: “It probably needs for them to ‘drop the feed dogs’ and speed up the machine a little. Basically that makes it so your movements set the stitch length.

That’s what my machine requires to fix such a problem.

BUT, it might not work for them, because their machine might not allow for that. If that doesn’t work, I usually switch to a quilting foot called a WALKING FOOT and just do straight lines letting the machine move the quilt.”

Blankets I Own

#1: Char and Joe’s Christmas Quilt

This queen-sized quilt was a Christmas gift from my sister and her husband; I think I got it in around 2000, give or take a year or so. They presented me with completed individual squares (each square made up of two triangles, one dark red and the other on the white/pink scale) and asked me to pick out the way I wanted them to go together. After trying out a few different patterns, I decided I liked the light squares with the red zig-zags around them.

The quilt has gotten a lot of use and is getting frayed here and there, but it’s still my main bed quilt and it looks great.

You can see the backing of the quilt here, and the machine quilting.

Since the quilt is too big to fit on the futon I used to model it, I wanted to take another, closer shot so you could see the quilt’s border.

If you’re having trouble picturing the basic square used to construct the quilt, there are four of them here, to the right of the border. They meet in the center of the lighter area.


#2: Mom’s crocheted afghan

My mother likes to crochet afghans, and here’s one she gave to me. Sometimes they are very ordered, sometimes they have variations on a theme, and other times they are more freeform, as is the case here. I throw this one on the bed when it’s particularly cold.


#3: Grandma’s square quilt

I believe this was a gift from my grandmother Mig. It’s a square quilt that doesn’t quite cover my bed, so, for the most part, I decorate my futon couch with it.

As is often the case, you can see the quilting best by looking on the reverse of the quilt.

Here’s a closer view of the front of the quilt. The quilting on the border is something else.


#4: Char’s Challenge Quilt

Some of my relatives would set quilting challenges for themselves; for instance, each of them would pick a fabric, without any reference to what the others were picking; and then they would need to make a quilt using only those fabrics. These became known as the ‘kill or cure’ challenges, and this quilt was the one my sister made for the final such challenge. The quilt is beautiful, but if you look at the individual fabrics, you will see that making them work together would be tricky. (I think my sister might have hand-dyed some of them, which was allowed, but even so …)

I wanted to give a bit of a close-up to allow you to better see the fabrics that were used.


#5: Jake’s Knitted Blanket

This is based on a Debbie Bliss pattern from her ‘Great Knits for Kids’. At some point in 2006 I happened across a sale on Aunt Lydia’s Denim Quick Crochet Yarn, and I bought six or seven giant spools of it; then, when I got it home, I realized I would have to figure out what to do with it, and panicked a bit. Well, this pattern definitely was good for getting through a bunch of it. I also threw in a couple of hundred-yard skeins of Rowan Denim, one black and one blue.

I started knitting this in May of 2006 and finished it the following January, eight months of fairly steady knitting. It got a little dispiriting towards the middle, but I managed to power through.

One feature of Rowan denim yarn is that it fades and shrinks after washing, sort of like a pair of jeans would; you can see that at work in the two stripes of Rowan denim I used here.The Aunt Lydia’s denim yarn that made up the bulk of this project doesn’t do that.

You can also see in a bit more detail all the cable stitches that drove me crazy for the eight months I spent knitting this thing.

The stripes were originally black and dark blue, as can be seen in this photo, which I took just after I finished knitting the blanket.


#6: Jake’s Quilt

I’ve only made one quilt in my life, and here it is. The idea for the pattern occurred to me one day, so I sketched it out, and, with the help of my mother, made it. It’s a couple of feet square and not really useful for anything, so I hang it on the wall of my apartment.

http://rartastic.tumblr.com/post/77548430136/dont-get-me-wrong-i-had-a-good-day-i-really

rartastic:

Don’t get me wrong, I had a good day. […] 

I just don’t know how or when or if I even should (or could) change my life to try to fit in finding someone I like enough to date. So yeah. I’m very single and likely to remain that way forever.

I think I’m somewhat older than rartastic, and I know that society has different expectations for men and women, so people in other situations should take this with a grain of salt. With all that said: At this point in my life, my feeling is: Yes, sometimes I have regrets about being single; but I think many people in relationships also have regrets from time to time. At some point, I feel like I have to just accept the choices I’ve made in my life (either explicitly or implicitly) and get on with things.

This is not to say that I’ve closed the door entirely to finding someone to be in a relationship with — just that it’s not the priority for me that it seems to be for many other people (and, to be clear, I don’t think there is anything wrong with either; different priorities work for different people.) Being single has turned out to be pretty fulfilling, for me.

I tried ending this little essay in a few different ways, but wasn’t satisfied with any of them, so perhaps those few caveat-filled paragraphs will do, for now.

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